Digital Civics and the art of not solving the problem

For many years, HCI focused on usability and accessibility of work systems and their functions where research in laboratories was used to understand the usability of interfaces and design of new systems (Kutti and Bannon, 2014). However, certain traces of the humanistic view with its importance of context and research in situ and attempts of involving people in government work could also be seen in HCI in the 80s and even earlier.

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Reflections on data: the need for context

In the world of ubiquitous computing we can see (or rather we can’t) Big Data generated around us constantly. We can quantify-ourselves by tracking our sleep, calorie-intake, number of steps and even how many coffees we had this week. Sounds like a Black Mirror episode in the making. We can track our utility consumption,

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Crowd Design: Engine of Innovation

The area of crowdwork has developed so swiftly that we’re spoilt for choice in terms of crowdsourcing platforms. Irani and Silberman [5] offer an analysis of one. Born in 2005 – Amazon Mechanical Turk (AMT) acts as a meeting point for requesters (employers) who want to outsource jobs split into micro tasks,

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HCI and the problem-solving problem

What is HCI? And more to the point, what is good quality HCI research? The foregrounding of these questions seems to pinpoint an overriding insecurity that allows for a jockeying for position in terms of finding a unified approach.  Oulasvirta and Hornbaek [3] in their paper HCI Research as Problem-Solving,

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